Monday, March 20, 2017

Of St. Blaise and Fishbone

A fishbone was stuck deep in my throat two weeks ago and believe me when the wound is infected, it’s so excruciatingly painful. After accidentally swallowed a bone of a fish locally called bugaong, I paid no attention to it believing that it was already dislodged by mouthful of bananas and marshmallows I swallowed hours after without chewing. I presume, like in the past, the wound would naturally take care of itself without me even trying.

But after three days my condition worsened. I cannot tolerate the pain anymore and there’s already a tint of blood in my spittle so I have to cut short the Gender Sensitivity Training I am attending that time at the Grand Creek Resort in Sta. Cruz and rushed to San Jose to see my EENT.

Dr. Alexander M. Rivera, MD examined my throat, assured me that the fishbone already been dislodged but left an infected internal wound surrounded with abscess. He prescribed me heavy dosage of antibiotics to be taken for 7 days. On the sixth day, my medical condition worsens, so I went back to his clinic. He changed his previously prescribed medicine, added a pain reliever and an oral antiseptic for my extended medical treatment.

I was writhing with pain and discomfort one Friday night and my youngest child related to me about the homily shared by a visiting priest during a Eucharistic celebration at school. Sophia is a Grade 7 student of Divine Word College of San Jose. The mass was held February 3 (I swallowed the fishbone February 17), Feast Day of St. Blaise, once bishop of Sebaste in Armenia.

St. Blaise’s biography revealed that science and faith are not on opposite poles. He was a physician before consecrated bishop. By the 6th century, St. Blaise’s intercession was invoked for diseases of the throat. He was a physician who treated by means of medical science but equally performing miraculous cures. While being imprisoned and tortured for his Christian faith, he phenomenally cured a little boy choking to death on a fishbone lodged in the kid’s throat.

My youngest daughter reminded me of Blaise and led me to start a prayer of intercession that very moment. Even I am away for work, she assured me that she will continue the novena before she goes to sleep. After three days or so, with the invincible combination of medication and meditation, I am back to my old self again!   

While we Catholics invoke Blaise for his protection against any physical ailment of the throat, we are reminded too that we should refrain from spreading the throat’s “spiritual sins” such as cursing, profanity, unkind remarks, detraction and gossip. While I cannot guarantee you me refraining from naughty remarks, take my word that the words coming from my mouth will always speak with comprehension and not intransigence, respect and not disparagement.

I am a believer so I trust that intercessory prayer can contribute to physical healing. But friends, I am in no way advising to say the same prayer to St. Blaise to those who do not believe that he is truly an intermediary to God. More so, I would not suggest to a wounded or ailing atheist to pray. Such a gesture or proposition is a further insult to his injury, much more his conviction!

I believe that the science of a present-day medical doctor and the act of faith in the memory of a martyr from the very distant past healed me.

This I believe deep to the bones…